Workplace Safety

A safe workplace is a healthy workplace. No matter whether you are working with hazardous chemicals, sitting in front of a computer, making donuts, or wrestling alligators, it is important for your workplace to present minimum health and safety standards. However, the particulars of those standards varied quite a bit in the past depending on who employed you. In fact, they may not have existed at all.

workplace safety

In order to ensure that everyone has access to protections that are understandable and can be implemented, a workplace hazard material information system was created: PSHSA – health and safety training certification. That acronym stands for the Public Services Health & Safety Association.

The idea behind this association and its recommendations is that workers should know all of the possible hazards they can face at their particular job while performing their duties. That is your right as a worker in this country.

The Ontario Ministry of Labour offers training courses that provide the necessary learning and information to help make work a safer place to be. Such knowledge is especially important when it comes to young people. Those entering the work force for the first time are among those most likely to be injured or killed in a work-related accident. Thus, both education before starting the job and working to ensure that conditions are safe must be considered.

Companies that have 20 or more employees must have a minimum of two people on staff that have completed JHSC Certification training. They can answer questions and act when a situation arises that could possibly create a safety concern. The latter can be discovered through regular workplace inspections. Should an accident actually occur, a thorough investigation will help determine the cause and produce information on how such an occurrence can be avoided in future.

 

Working & Retiring

While we are living in the 9-to-5 grind of the working world, many of us spend our idle time dreaming of retirement. The ability to sleep whenever we want (and for as long as we want), do things whenever the fancy strikes us, and take our own sweet time to live life is very appealing.

Retirement can be bliss, but those who have been dedicated working people for decades can find it quite jarring at first. Not having a set schedule seems wonderful for a while, but some people soon start to feel unproductive and unhappy.

Here are some activities that will help to make your retirement fulfilling and the gift you dreamed it would be:

GET BACK TO WORK

“Wait, what? I just left the job and now you want me to go back?” No, not necessarily. However, this is your chance to choose a new direction in life. Was there a vocation that you passed up before for reasons of financial viability or availability? Well, here is your chance to look into it again. Also, you don’t have to do this job full-time. If you only want to work a day or two a week, then look for a position allowing for that kind of flexibility.

VOLUNTEERING

This is another way to stay active and contribute. Pick an area that is of importance to you and don’t be afraid to try a few different agencies. Volunteering must also be fulfilling for the volunteer, so don’t be afraid of resigning if that is not the case.

HOBBIES

Never had time to pursue that hobby you enjoyed? Here is your chance to take it up in earnest again. You can also try different things and possibly develop an entirely new passion.

Retirement is not the end of life, but the chance for a new beginning. You now have much more free time at your disposal, so make the best use of it to expand your horizons and further develop your interests.

Happy 40th Birthday to the Elora Gorge Cinema!

When most people think of a night out at the movies, it usually means going to one of the many multiplexes found coast to coast in Canada (about 75% of which are now owned by Cineplex Odeon).

However, it wasn’t always this way. Theatres used to be large, single screen affairs in big cities and long, narrow structures found on the main street of small towns. In addition to first run houses, there were also repertory theatres. Smaller, more intimate affairs, rep houses ran movies that had already finished their time in first run theatres, as well as movies that were often quite old, but ripe for revival.

Rep houses were a pretty common sight in big cities and some small towns, but have grown increasingly scarce in recent years, particularly with the switch over to digital, an expense that not all independent cinemas could manage.

One that has managed to weather all of the changes that have occurred in the industry during the past four decades is the Elora Gorge Cinema. Located in the lovely small town of the same name and now in its 40th year, the Gorge served as both a small town cinema and a rep house, running new-ish movies alongside classics from other eras.

Nowadays, the Gorge rarely runs older movies (though Roman Polanski’s CHINATOWN from 1974 is on the schedule this month), offering instead films that have run their course at Cineplex as well as indie and foreign movies that would not be booked at multiplexes. It’s a nice mix that serves both cinephiles and casual moviegoers.

Admission price is comparable to the chain theatres, though a bit less if you buy a membership. The theatre itself is nice and cozy, with a good quality digital projector and sound system. The stone walls provide a different kind of ambiance from your generic corporate theatre and are very appropriate given the close proximity of the gorge. It’s a great place to see a movie and another reason to stop by this lovely town when in the area.

Hillside Festival: A Guelph Tradition

If you live in or near Guelph, Ontario, you are no doubt familiar with the Hillside Festival. The yearly get together attracts many people from the city and surrounding area, as well as neighboring cities like Toronto.

Hillside debuted in June 1984 as a one day, 11-hour music festival. Admission was free! The festival gradually grew in size, moving to Guelph Lake Island in 1987. The festival continued to grow in popularity, with its artistic and cultural value recognized via Ontario Arts Council and City of Guelph grants. The following year, Hillside had its first sold out Saturday night.

The festival is now a major Guelph event that attracts many well-established and upcoming acts. This year’s dates for Hillside are July 14-16 at the Guelph Lake Conservation area, as per usual. The act list is now up and includes some very talented performers, including Sarah Harmer, The Jerry Cans, Lisa LeBlanc, Common Deer, and Chastity.

If you haven’t done Hillside before, it’s not just sitting and listening to music and spoken word performances. You go for the day or for all three days, camping on the site. The event is family friendly and even includes a kids’ stage, so you don’t have to worry that the kids will get bored. There are also vendors and workshops you can participate in, if you don’t feel like listening to the acts performing at that time.

You can book your campsite space either over the phone or online. As of this writing, we are getting very close to the start dates, so you may only be able to go on a daily basis at this point. Regardless, while camping is fun, it’s not a necessity: you can still have a great time at Hillside if you just come for the day.

Check out the official Hillside site here.